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Friday, October 20, 2017

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Sunday, April 23, 2017

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Monday, April 10, 2017

Travel to Romania "The Place Where History Began"

Romania (România)  is situated in the north of the Balkan Peninsula on the western shores of the Black Sea. It enjoys great natural beauty and diversity and a rich cultural heritage. Romania enchants visitors with its scenic mountain landscapes and unspoiled countryside areas, and also with its historic cities and its busy capital. Over the last decade Romania had undergone a significant development and it is one of the recent members of the European Union. 
Tourists from western countries might still, even today, enjoy some surprising experiences in Romania. This is a large country which can sometimes be shocking with contrasts: some cities are truly Western Europe; some villages can seem to have been brought back from the past. While it has significant cultural similarities with other Balkan states, it is regarded as unique due to its strong Latin heritage. Things for which Romania is famous include: the Carpathian mountains, sculptor Constantin Brancusi, wine, salt mines, George Enescu,
medieval fortresses, Eugene Ionesco, "Dacia" cars, Dracula, stuffed cabbage leaves, Nadia Comaneci, primeval dense forests, the Black Sea, Gheorghe Hagi, sunflower fields, wolves and bears, painted monasteries, the Danube Delta, etc. etc.


With a Black Sea coast to the south-east, it is bordered by Bulgaria to the south, Serbia to the southwest, Hungary to the northwest, Moldova to the northeast and Ukraine in both the north and the east. While its southern regions are usually seen as part of South-east European Balkans, Transylvania, its central and largest region, has a more western-central European look.


History




The Cucuteni culture, is a Neolithic–Eneolithic archaeological culture (c. 5200 to 3500 BC) in Eastern Europe.

It extends from the Carpathian Mountains to the Dniester and Dnieper regions, centered on modern-day Moldova and covering substantial parts of western Ukraine and northeastern Romania, encompassing an area of 350,000 km2(140,000 sq mi)

The majority of Cucuteni-Trypillian settlements consisted of high-density, small settlements (spaced 3 to 4 kilometers apart), concentrated mainly in the Siret, Prut, and Dniester river valleys.During the Middle Trypillia phase (c. 4000 to 3500 BC), populations belonging to the Cucuteni-Trypillian culture built the largest settlements in Neolithic Europe, some of which contained as many as 3,000 structures and were possibly inhabited by 20,000 to 46,000 people.
One of the most notable aspects of this culture was the periodic destruction of settlements, with each single-habitation site having a lifetime of roughly 60 to 80 years. The purpose of burning these settlements is a subject of debate among scholars; some of the settlements were reconstructed several times on top of earlier habitational levels, preserving the shape and the orientation of the older buildings. One particular location, the Poduri site in Romania, revealed thirteen habitation levels that were constructed on top of each other over many years.
In ancient times the territory of present day Romania was inhabited mainly by Dacian tribes, who had aBurebista ruled from his power base in the Carpathian Mountains over a vast territory stretching from Central Europe to the Black Sea. The intriguing network of fortifications and shrines built around the historical Dacian capital Sarmizegetusa, in today's south-western Transylvania, has been relatively well preserved through the ages and is now recognized as a UNESCO World Heritage site.
remarkable, although not very well known, culture. The Dacian kingdom reached its peak in the 1st century BC, when their king Decebal ..
In 106 AD the Dacians were defeated by the Romans, most of their homeland becoming a province of the Roman Empire. Being quite rich in natural resources (including gold, silver, salt, etc.), the region prospered under the Roman administration: cities developed rapidly, imperial roads were built and people from all over the Empire settled there. That's why, despite the fact that Roman administration lasted in Dacia less than 200 years, a population with a distinctive Latin character and language emerged there. Naturally, later on they were influenced by the neighbouring Slavic peoples with whom they were in contact.
In the Early Middle Ages Hungarians began settling in the area today known as Transylvania, which would eventually become after years a part of the Kingdom of Hungary. German Saxons also settled in that area (in several waves), starting from the 12th century. In order to protect themselves from frequent Tartar or Turkish invasions, they set about building fortified cities and castles, many of which remained to this day. South and east of the Carpathians, the two Romanian speaking principalities of Wallachia and Moldavia were created in the 14th century. Starting with the 15th century, both of them (and for a while Transylvania too) fell under the domination of the Ottoman Empire.
For a short period in 1600, Michael The Brave (Mihai Viteazul) ruled over all three principalities, thus briefly becoming historically the first de-facto ruler of a unified Romania. The international scene, however, was not ready yet to accept and recognize a unified Romania, thus his union fell a short while later.
A Romanian national revival movement started in Transylvania in the late 1700's and swept across the Carpathians, inspiring the 1859 unification of Moldavia and Wallachia, thus creating modern national Romania. In 1917-1919 Transylvania and Eastern Moldavia (today part of the Republic of Moldova) were united with Romania ("Greater Romania").
"Soviet occupation following World War II led to the formation of a Communist "people's republic" ("R.P.R") in 1947 and the abdication of the king. Between 1947 and 1965, Romania was led by Gheorghe Gheorghiu-Dej with a pro-Soviet stance throughout most of his administration. In 1965, he was succeeded by Nicolae Ceauşescu who was less enthusiastic towards the Soviet Union and maintained a more neutral foreign policy than his predecessor alongside a harsh internal terror regime. During the 1980s, his notorious Securitate secret police became a strong force. The leader was overthrown and executed in late 1989."(CIA World Factbook). Former Communists, regrouped around the Front of National Salvation and the Romanian Party for Social Democracy dominated the government until the 1996 elections, when they were swept from power by a fractious coalition of centrist parties, after failed reforms were replaced by the Social Democratic Party. Both groups attempted to amend ties with Hungary, which were deeply fractured back in the 1980s, when Ceausescu either encouraged the large Hungarian community to leave the country or exiled them outright (5.000 Hungarians left Romania anually). 

When the economic, social and political development is concerned Romania is doing well in comparison to other countries in the Western Balkans region and other surrounding countries in Eastern Europe such as Ukraine and Moldova. However when compared to Western Europe, Romania still has some ways to go to reach that level of development that is enjoyed by the Western Europeans. However Romania's membership in the European Union will help in closing the gap in the years to come.






Regions


Transylvania
It is the most famous region of Romania, a land of medieval castles and towns, dark forests, snowy peaks (especially those in Transylvanian Alps). At the same time a region experiencing rapid economical development, with modern youthful cities, huge shopping centers, massive infrastructure projects etc.
Banat
This western-most province is probably the most economically developed in Romania. It has beautiful baroque cities and traditional German villages in the western plains and huge mountain forests in the eastern parts.
Oltenia
The south-western region, with impressive monasteries, caves and health resorts along the mountains in its northern part and a bizarre desert-like area in the south.
Southern Bukovina
This north-eastern region is famous for its Painted Monasteries, tucked away between picturesque rolling hills.
Maramureş
The northern-most region, it's best known for its timeless villages, traditional wooden churches and beautiful mountain landscape.
Crişana
Located along the border with Hungary, this western region is the entry point for most travelers into Romania, who often neglect its Central-European style cities, numerous medieval sites and resorts on the western side of the Apuseni mountains.
Dobrogea
A seaside province dotted by ruins of ancient Greek and Roman cities, with various summer resorts along the Black Sea Coast and the unspoiled natural landscape of the Danube Delta and the Black Sea lagoons (all of which are Biosphere Reserves and UNESCO World Heritage Sites) in the region's north. Also very ethnically diverse region with many small minority groups.
Moldavia
Certainly one of the most extraordinary regions in Romania, it offers a pleasant blend of historical cities, medieval fortresses, churches, wine and friendly locals.
Muntenia
Also known as Wallachia. The capital, Bucharest, is in this southern region, as well as the early residences of the Wallachian princes and the mountain resorts on the Prahova Valley. It is also the name of the old kingdom of leaders such as the notorious Vlad Ţepeş (The Impaler).



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Cities

  • Bucharest — the capital of Romania, in which megalomanic monuments, including "House of the
    People" (now the Palace of Parliament), built during Ceauşescu's regime, overlook medieval and later neo-classical neighbourhoods.
  • Brașov — located in south-eastern Transylvania, its main attractions are the well kept medieval downtown, the nearby luxury resort of Poiana Braşov and the proximity to Rasnov and the Bran ("Dracula's") Castle.
  • Cluj-Napoca — the largest town in Transylvania, is a major economic center and a youthful city, housing one of the largest universities in Europe.
  • Constanţa — Romania's main Black Sea port and one of the major commercial hubs in the region. The northernmost Litoral district, Mamaia, is thought to be one of the best Black Sea resorts.

  • Iaşi — in Moldavia, the second largest Romanian city, once the historic capital of the Moldavian principality until 1861, and for some time capital of Romania. Today it is one of the major economic and cultural centres in the country.
  • Sibiu — one of the most beautiful cities in Transylvania, it has the best preserved historical sites in the country, many museums and exhibitions, proximity to the stunning Făgăraş mountains, for which reasons it became the 2007 European Capital of Culture.
  • Sighişoara — the city's downtown area, the Sighisoara Citadel, is the last inhabited medieval citadel in Europe and one of the best historical monuments preserved nowdays. 
  • Suceava — the main city in Bukovina and the medieval capital of the Moldavian principality; it can be the starting point for visiting the famous painted Monasteries in the region.
  • Timişoara — the largest town in the Banat region, it is one of the most prosperous and modernized cities in Romania; it was there that the 1989 Romanian anti-communist revolution began.
  • Oradea — a beautiful city, situated in the north-west of Romania, at about 10 kilometers from the western Romanian border. Capital of the Crisana region, it has a long and rich history, being mentioned for the first time in a document in the year 1113. Oradea is rich in beautiful buldings and historical sites, featuring a mixture of architectural styles: baroque, rococo, and Renaissance. It is indeed a place to visit.  
  • Craiova — the 6th largest city in Romania, located near the east bank of the river Jiu in central Oltenia at approximately equal distances from the Southern Carpathians (north) and the River Danube (south). It is a longstanding political center, being formerly the capital of Oltenia.
  • Ploiesti — the 9th largest city in Romania,located at 60 km north of Bucharest. It is recognized as the center of the Romanian oil industry - has four refineries and numerous companies operating in industries related to this branch.








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Friday, March 31, 2017

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Wednesday, March 29, 2017

Best Summer Destinations TOP10


                                      10. BAHAMAS





The Bahamas or The Bahama Islands, is an archipelago consisting of about 2,000 islands if you include the cays, which are small islands that are formed on coral reefs.

The country is officially named The Commonwealth of The Bahamas. The word Bahamas is of Spanish origin and means 'Shallow Water'. They are located in the Atlantic Ocean, not the Caribbean Sea.


Bahamas beaches are an attraction in themselves but Bahamas is known for also possessing landmarks. Some landmarks include The Pompey Museum of Slavery and Emancipation (formerly known as The Vendue House) and Paradise Island which possesses many attractions in itself. There are Forts and monuments all over the city of Nassau and they are open everyday for your viewing pleasure. Also there are several art galleries such as the National Art Gallery of the Bahamas, the Central Bank (Lobby), the National Treasury building (Lobby), the D'Aguliar Art foundation and many others where you can view original Bahamian works of art

Bahamas Dolphin Encounters (Swim with Dolphins in the Bahamas), One Marina Drive, P.O. Box SS-6257, Nassau (800) 205-0729[30]No Bahamas vacation would be complete without an encounter with dolphins, and booking a dolphin experience through Bahamas Dolphin Encounters is a sure way to make sure this dream comes true for you and your family. It's an incredible feeling to get up close and personal with friendly dolphins, and even on a deserted island or in the open ocean

Accommodation in the Bahamas is expensive, and there is virtually no backpacker/hostel-type lodging. The cheapest hotels start at around $70, and most hotels cost $200-300/night, with the very best resorts easily pushing up above $500. Deals may be available in the summer off-season though.
Be aware the Bahamas charge a "Service Fee or Resort Fee" to every person staying overnight. Hotels collect the fee of $18 per night per person as well as a $6 per person one time bellhop fee. This is an addition to the rate of the room and is not optional and cannot be waived. Often tourists first hear about this when checking into their hotel for the first time.
info source : http://wikitravel.org/en/Bahamas
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                                    9. IBIZA, Spain



Ibiza or Eivissa (the official name) is one of the Balearic Islands. The maximum length of the island by highway is 42 km.
Explore some of the traditional countryside of this beautiful island that few people take the time to enjoy.
Take a boat or go parasailing.

Learn Spanish in some of the language schools around the island. Some of them are specialised on teaching Spanish as a foreign language. Most of them are located in Ibiza town, where you also will be able to make use of your knowledge the best way and it also will be easier to stay in hostels near a school.
Take part in your own Professional Photoshoot.
Explore the wharf side festival. Hundreds of locals flock to the carnival-style stands for fresh foods, enticing smells, and quality made trinkets.
A merchant sells luxurious hand-made soaps that cast a wonderful aroma into the air.
During the local beach front festivals, merchants offer a wide array of goods. Pictured above is a fragrant batch of healthful herbs, for making teas or incense.
The numerous stalls are alive with colors and patterns. Above are recognizable wooden figures, hand crafted from the skilled merchants.
In addition to incredible tastes and smells, there is a strong visual aspect to the festivals. A snake charmer is seen leading a small parade through the different stands at the glee and fright of small children everywhere.
If you're interested in craft beer, visit Ibiza's first microbrewery Ibosim Brewhouse located in Port des Torrent
info source : http://wikitravel.org/en/Ibiza


                                        8. MIAMI


Also offseason in the summer, Miami continues to draw visitors, especially Europeans and South Americans escaping winter. To keep cool in the blazing heat, you need only take a dip in the Atlantic, Biscayne Bay … or an infinity pool. You’ll be able to spread out on South Beach, plus people-watching on Lincoln Road and Miami Beach’s epic nightlife will be as entertaining as ever.
Best for: A spontaneous getaway to blow off a little steam on a boat or in the club.




                               7.Catalina Island, CA


Angelenos looking for a respite from the smog and traffic are finding it on Catalina Island. Make the 22-mile trip by ferry or helicopter — the latter will set you back only about $110 — and you’ll find an island of paradoxes: campgrounds where wild buffalo roam (a herd was abandoned after a 1924 movie shoot) and the ritzy, Mediterranean-flavored city of Avalon.
Best for: A day at the beach spent snorkeling, swimming, hiking or biking.
source  : http://www.travelchannel.com/interests/packages/we-are-summer/articles/top-10-summer-destinations


                               6. Mamaia, Romania



Mamaia is a resort and the largest on the Romanian Black Sea shore. It is north-east of ConstanţaRomania and has few time residents, with the population being mostly summer residents.
Cable Car - great views of the beach
  • Beaches Mamaia is also the only resort in Europe to have the pure white sand only found in tropical places such as Hawaii. The beach season is at its best between mid-May and late September, when average daytime temperatures are 25 to 30 degrees Celsius (78 to 86 degrees Fahrenheit). The water is warm until late autumn.
  • Hotels range from mid-end (2 and 3 stars) to exclusive 4 and 5 stars hotels and private clubs.

You'll probably be getting in via Constanţa, with several options for public transit if you don't have your own transportation. Buses 23E and 41 depart from Constanţa’s main rail station, and 23 also stops near the northern bus station. Buses 41 and 47 run to and from the north end of the Mamaia strip. In high season, a small army of maxitaxi's also run to and from Mamaia, but keep in mind that all public transport can get crowded during rush hours then. If possible, buy a ticket in advance at the train station or nearby shops.
If you're driving in by car yourself, count on a small access fee (in the range of <1 euro).





                                  5. Sunny Beach, Bulgaria




Sunny Beach is centered around tourism. It offers great parties, but is not a "traditional" Bulgarian small town.
Sunny Beach is a popular holiday destination among many European countries. Probably the main variety of people visiting are young people (around 20s) attracted by the very well developed night life in the resort. Other part are foreign groups and families, mostly Russian and German. It may not provide too much activities for children, but many of the restaurants do have a small playground or such.
There are no street names except Flower Street for the main pedestrian street from the main road down to the Beach Promenade and the pier.
Sunny Beach pretty much shuts down for winter. The season is often divided into three:
Low season from beginning of May to mid-June, September
Middle season: mid-June to (mid-)July, mid-August to September
High season: (mid-)July to mid-August, or even until end of August
However May is probably not recommended as even if some hotels are open, many restaurants etc. apparently don't open until June. Same goes for the end of season.

info source : http://wikitravel.org/en/Sunny_Beach


                                 4. Amsterdam, Holland





At first, Amsterdam may seem out of place on this list, but summer is the ideal time to visit the city. The gray skies have lifted, festivals abound and events to enjoy include the Open Garden Days, when visitors can peek into the private gardens behind the beautiful houses that line the famous canals.
Best for: An urban adventure, traversing Amsterdam’s thousands of bridges and waterways by bike and by boat in search of the perfect brown café.
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3.BORA BORA





Bora Bora is a volcanic island in the Society Islands archipelago of French Polynesia.
It is perfectly possible to spoil oneself in one of the incredibly luxurious high-class resorts and spend the savings of a lifetime in a few days. Nonetheless, a bit of planning ahead can allow enjoyment of the majestic scenery with a tighter budget. Keep in mind that in any case Bora Bora is a tremendously pricey destination. Everything (catering and activities) ranges from "expensive" to "indescribably expensive".
Bora Bora is an island in the Leeward group of the Society Islands of French Polynesia, an "Overseas Country" financially assisted by France in the Pacific Ocean. The island, located about 230 kilometres (140 mi) northwest of Papeete, is surrounded by a lagoon and a barrier reef. In the center of the island are the remnants of an extinct volcano rising to two peaks, Mount Pahia and Mount Otemanu, the highest point at 727 metres (2,385 ft). The original name of the island in the Tahitian language might be better rendered as Pora Pora, meaning "First Born"; an early transcription found in 18th- and 19th century accounts, is Bolabolla or Bollabolla.
The major settlement, Vaitape is on the western side of the island, opposite the main channel into the lagoon. The products of the island are mostly limited to what can be obtained from the sea and coconut trees, which were historically of economic importance for copra. During the August 2007 census, the population on the island was about 8,880 people.




                                                                 2. DUBAI




Dubai (دبي) is one of the seven emirates that make up the United Arab Emirates. It is rather like an independent city-state and is the most modern and progressive emirate in the UAE, developing at an unbelievable pace in the tourist and trade sectors especially. Recently Dubai won the bid to host EXPO 2020, a Universal scale Registered Exposition approved by the Bureau of International Expositions (BIE), Paris.

A relatively new tourist destination, Dubai was gaining popularity in recent years until the global economic crash of 2008. Dubai is essentially a desert city with superb infrastructure, liberal policies (by regional standards), that became popular for its excellent tourist amenities. Just 5 h from Europe and 3 h from most parts of the Middle East, the Near East, and the subcontinent of India, Dubai makes a great short break for shopping, partying, sunbathing, fine dining, sporting events, and even a few sinful pleasures. It is a city of superlatives: for the fastest, biggest, tallest, largest and highest, Dubai is the destination. It has the largest immigrant population in the world. The weekly day off is on Friday. Note that, since September 2006, a harmonised weekend of Friday and Saturday has been adopted for the public sector and schools. Government departments, multinational companies, and most schools and universities are now off on Friday and Saturday (after years of a mixed bag of Friday/Saturday and Thursday/Friday weekends). Some local companies still work half a day on Thursday with a full day on Saturday, but larger companies tend to permit relaxation and time off work for their employees on Friday and Saturday.

Earlier the demand for hotel rooms badly outstripped supply, resulting in some of the most expensive rooms in the world: it was difficult to find anything decent for under Dhs 600 (US$200) especially during the September-May high season. However, now, as July 2009, there are several five star hotels offering rooms for less than $140 (€100) for off-season.
info source : http://wikitravel.org/en/Dubai





1. HAWAII




Hawaii  is the 50th state of the United States of America. Situated nearly at the center of the north Pacific Ocean, Hawaii marks the northeast corner of Polynesia. While it was once a major hub for the whaling, sugar and pineapple industries, it is now economically dependent on tourism and the U.S. military. The natural beauty of the islands continues to be one of Hawaii's greatest assets. Honolulu is the state's capital, largest city, and cultural hub. Hawaiian and English are the official languages of
Hawaii.


Islands

Map of Hawaii
Hawaii is an archipelago of over nineteen distinct volcanic islands located over a geological "hot spot" in the Central Pacific. The Pacific plate on which the islands ride moves to the northwest, so in general the islands are older and smaller (due to erosion) as you move from southeast to northwest. There are eight major islands, six of which are open to tourism.
  • Hawaii (Hawaiʻi) – almost always called the Big Island to avoid confusion – is the largest of the islands and home to Mauna Kea, Mauna Loa (the largest and one of the most active volcanoes on Earth), Hawaii Volcanoes National Park[2], coffee and macadamia nut plantations, working ranches, and even green sand beaches. Kailua-Kona is the busiest part of the island on the dry, leeward side, and near the mega-resort Kohala Coast area with nearly zero annual precipitation. The saddle road (quite passable and a must see--despite what rental car companies say) passes between the massive volcanoes and connects Kohala with Hilo, the largest town on the windward side with annual precipitation of more than 300 inches per year. Unlike anywhere else on Earth and definitely worth a look.
  • Oahu (Oʻahu), nicknamed "the Gathering Place," is the most populous and developed island. Its southern shore is home to the city of Honolulu, the state capital and largest city; four out of every five kama'aina (Hawaii residents) call it home. It is the governmental and commercial center of the state, and Waikiki Beach is arguably the best known tourist destination in Hawaii. Outside the city are pineapple fields, and the North Shore of Oahu, which is known each winter as the home of some of the largest waves in the world. The USS Arizona National Memorial at Pearl Harbor is also very popular visitor destination.
  • Maui is the second largest island in the chain and is home to 10,023 foot (3,055 m) tall volcanic mountain crater of Haleakala. It is nicknamed "the Valley Isle" for the narrow plain between Haleakala and the West Maui mountains. On the west side of the island are the resort areas of Lahaina, Kaanapali and Kapalua, while the south side is home to Kihei, and Wailea. On the east side is the tiny village of Hana, reached by one of the most winding and beautiful roads in the world.
  • Kauai (Kauaʻi), the "Garden Isle," is home to several natural wonders, such as the Wailua River, Waimea Canyon, and the Na Pali Coast. Mount Waialeale is known as one of the rainiest spots in the world.
  • Molokai (Molokaʻi), the "Friendly Isle," is one of the least developed islands in the chain. It is home to Kalaupapa, the leper colony on Molokai's north shore that was the home of Father Damien.
  • Lanai (Lānaʻi) was at one time completely owned by Dole Foods and was the largest pineapple plantation in the world; it is now home to several exclusive resorts.
  • Niihau (Niʻihau) is a privately owned island with an entirely Native Hawaiian population. Until very recently, the island was off limits to all but family members and invited guests of the owners. Tourism to the island is limited to helicopter, ATV, and hunting excursions originating on Kauai.
  • Kahoolawe (Kahoʻolawe), which was once a former U.S. Navy bombing range, remains uninhabited. Efforts are being made to rehabilitate the island, but cleanup efforts continue.

info source : http://wikitravel.org/en/Hawaii






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